Contracts, Warranties, Buying Tips

questions & answers

Question: I hired a moving company to move my stuff from WI to AZ (company is based in IL.) Upon reviewing the contract I discovered bad math, but I had already signed. When my stuff got here, I had to pay the remaining $650 in cash to the driver or he would return my items to IL and be charge for them holding my items. I was then pressured to place a $0 in the what is due. However, my issue is that they had overcharged me. The driver would not deal with any of those issues and I had to pay him. If I file a claim do I have a chance to be granted my overpayment, or am I SOL due to the $0 on balance due.

Answer: According to fmcsa.dot.gov/sites/fmcsa.dot.gov/files/docs/Protect_Your_Move_Brochure, pdf Movers  Without ever visiting the home or seeing the items to be moved, give a low estimate over the telephone or Internet. Once the items are on the movers truck, a demand for more money before deliver occurs or the movers will unload. The individuals items are held hostage forcing the client to  pay more — sometimes much more than agreed upon — received the possessions back.
The best defense is to recognize movers that are not honest before signing a contract.  Here are the “red flags” to look out for:
•    The mover doesn’t offer or agree to an on¬site inspection of your household goods and gives an estimate over the telephone
or Internet — sight¬ unseen. These estimates often sound too ¬good ¬to¬ be¬ true. They usually are.
•    The moving company demands cash or a large deposit before the move.
•    The mover doesn’t provide a copy of “Your Rights and Responsibilities When You Move,” a booklet movers are required by Federal regulations to supply to their
customers in the planning stages of interstate moves.
•    The company’s Web site has no local address and no information about their registration or insurance.
•    The mover claims all goods are covered by their insurance.
•    When you call the mover, the telephone is answered
with a generic “Movers” or “Moving company,” rather than the company’s name.
•    Offices and warehouse are in poor condition or nonexistent.
•    On moving day, a rental truck arrives rather than a company¬owned or marked fleet truck.
http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/sites/fmcsa.dot.gov/files/docs/Protect_Your_Move_Brochure.pdf

I don't think the question is answered - I believe she is asking if she can take them to small claims.  thoughts?  can nicole or kim fix or remove?

QUESTIONS

  • I hired a moving company to move my stuff from WI to AZ (company is based in IL.) Upon reviewing the contract I discovered bad math, but I had already signed. When my stuff got here, I had to pay the remaining $650 in cash to the driver or he would return my items to IL and be charge for them holding my items. I was then pressured to place a $0 in the what is due. However, my issue is that they had overcharged me. The driver would not deal with any of those issues and I had to pay him. If I file a claim do I have a chance to be granted my overpayment, or am I SOL due to the $0 on balance due.

STORIES

  • He told me that I could actually get all the money I needed by using my home as collateral. . .
  • Age discrimination in the workplace. . .
  • I just helped my mother, age 89, deal with her Medicare HMO. . .

LegalLEARN

YOUR FEEDBACK IS NEEDED

FIND LEGAL HELP

  • Please select your county of residence below.

    County:
     

OTHER LEGAL RESOURCES

  • State Bar of Arizona
    www.azbar.org
  • Maricopa County Bar
    www.maricopabar.org
    Referral number 602-257-4434
  • Pima County Bar
    www.pimacountybar.org
    Referral number 520-623-4625
  • National Domestic Violence Hotline
    800-799-7233
  • Bankruptcy Court Self Help Center
    866-553-0893
  • Certified Legal Document Preparer Program
    Link

ORGANIZATIONS