Divorce & Annulment Article


Divorce on the Navajo Nation - Grounds and Requirements

Divorce on the Navajo Nation:  Grounds and requirements

 

What are the grounds for divorce on the Navajo Nation?

A.       Underage.  The person asking for a divorce (the “Petitioner”) was under age 18 when (s)he got married.  This is not grounds if the Petitioner freely lived with the other person as husband and wife after reaching age 18.

B.      Former marriage.  If the husband or wife was already married to someone else (including common law marriage) when they married each other.

C.      Adultery.  Unlawful voluntary sexual intercourse of a married person with one of the opposite sex.

D.      Abandonment/Expulsion.  If either person willfully abandoned the other, or caused the Petitioner to leave against his/her wishes, for a period of six months before filing for divorce.

E.       Alcohol/narcotics.  When one of the spouses uses alcohol or drugs habitually to the mental anguish of the other.

F.       Abuse.  When one spouse inflicts “grievous bodily injury or grievous mental suffering” on the other.

G.     Neglect.  When the husband fails to support his family “according to his means, station in life, and ability.”

H.     Inability to live together in agreement and harmony.

I.        Pregnancy by another man.  In the husband’s favor if the wife was pregnant by another man when she married her husband, and the husband was unaware of it.  The divorce must be filed within a reasonable time after the husband learns of the (true nature of the) pregnancy.

J.        One-year separation.   Voluntary separation of the husband and wife for one year or more.

 

What are the requirements for filing for divorce?

 

“Personal jurisdiction.”   For the Navajo courts to “reach” the parties, the spouses must have “minimum contacts” with the Navajo Nation—they’re enrolled members of the tribe, or are eligible for enrollment, they lived, worked, spent time on, or visited the Navajo Nation, or children were conceived on the reservation.  “Personal jurisdiction” can be waived—regardless of who you are, if you come to the Navajo Court (or file a document with the court), you “submit yourself to the jurisdiction” of the Navajo Court.

 

90-Day Requirement.  The petitioner must live on the Navajo reservation for at least 90 days before filing for divorce in the Navajo Nation Family Court.

 

“Subject Matter Jurisdiction.”  The Navajo Nation has “original, exclusive” jurisdiction over domestic relations (including divorces) involving members of the Navajo Nation, or those eligible for enrollment with the Navajo Nation.  This means that divorce cases involving Navajo spouses or Navajo children must be filed in the Navajo Nation Family Court.  If neither spouse is Navajo (but they lived on the reservation), they can (but do not have to) file in the Navajo court.  Filing in state court is generally more expensive, more paperwork, and can take more time than filing in Navajo court; child support guidelines and alimony awards in NM and AZ state courts are very similar to those in Navajo courts.

 

Filing Fee.  The filing fee is $10, and it must be paid to the Family Court of the Navajo Nation when a divorce petition is filed with the Court.  There may be additional money needed if the spouse’s whereabouts are unknown, and the Petitioner has to publish legal notice in the newspaper.

 


Comments:

QUESTIONS

  • In the state of Arizona in a no - fault divorce does the state require a period of separation
  • I have been seperated from my wife for over 18 years but we are still married. What do i need to do to get a divorce?
  • I am disabled and my husband has abandoned me now for close to a year. He filed a order to stop me from being able to talk to him as he refuses to divorce me but is living with another woman.He failed to tell the judge we r in a covenant marriage. I need free/cheap legal help. PLZ!
  • In the military, is retired pay divided?
  • My husband wants a Divorce and we have a boat that has His Name OR my name. Does the word OR make it community property? He says it was a gift to him and won't sell it. What does the word OR mean on the title? Is it community property?
  • My wife and I are living separate and have divided all of our assets and financials. Also we signed a contract to protect one another. Will this hold up in court if we decide to get divorced later?
  • My husband is incarcerated and we have two children. I am in the process of submitting my petition for a dissolution of marriage and noticed we are required to complete a parenting class. Is there a waiver for a parent that is incarcerated or any other way this class can be completed by him?
  • Husband wants to buy me of home mortgage which is under my name only. I would love to keep the home but I don't want to start a fight so I am considering moving out with my 2 kids. I want to be the primary household for my kids which is why I want them to live with me most of the time. What should I consider when moving out? Will this affect me negatively in or out of court?
  • We have a covenant marriage there has been abuse on both sides I've wanted a divorce he refuses to give me one. I cannot find any forms to fill out can someone help me with a template or some kind of help please I can't live like this anymore I hate that he lies all the time I hate him I just want a divorce
  • How is spousal support determined? Is there a formula used by the court to determine how much should be awarded?

STORIES

  • If you get a divorce, make sure your date of birth is on the Decree if your name is changing!. . .
  • He told me that I could actually get all the money I needed by using my home as collateral. . .
  • I just helped my mother, age 89, deal with her Medicare HMO. . .

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